JPSS Site Logo
A collaborative mission between NOAA and NASA  NOAA LogoNASA Logo
News Highlights
The JPSS-1 satellite and its instruments will undergo a variety of rigorous tests during the environmental testing period, which include compatibility testing with the ground system.

Read full story here >>
The contractor will manufacture, test and deliver two OMPS instruments, support instrument integration on the JPSS-3 and JPSS-4 spacecraft, and provide launch and post-launch support.

Read full story here >>
Imagery from JPSS satellites remain a critical resource to increase the timeliness and accuracy of public warnings and forecasts of severe flooding, thus reducing the potential loss of human life, enabling better preparedness, and building more resilient communities.

Read full story here >>
Imagemap Video Gallery Media Gallery

The first low-earth orbiting satellite to conduct remote sensing of Earth, TIROS-1, was launched on April 1, 1960.

JPSS' polar satellites orbit the Earth completely 14 times a day.

The National Weather Service is able to make forecasts 3-7 days in advance of a severe weather event thanks largely to data from polar-orbiting satellites.

Countries around the world use data from JPSS satellites to help develop their forecasts.

The Suomi NPP satellite produces approximately 3.5 terabytes of data per day.

Data from JPSS satellites supports all of NOAA's mission areas, including preparing for a more "Weather-Ready Nation."

JPSS Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) instrument continues a record of more than 30 years of ozone measurements for the U.S.

Every day, the JPSS Proving Ground Program works to prepare users for the technological and operational advances that JPSS satellites will bring.

More than 30 Billion dollar disasters occurred in the U.S. in the last 3 years. Data from NOAA satellites help forecasters identify severe weather in advance to better prepare.

JPSS anticipates that the JPSS-1 satellite will produce approximately 4.5 terabytes of data per day.

News Archive
Launch Schedule
Why JPSS?

The Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) is our Nation's next generation polar-orbiting operational environmental satellite system. JPSS is a collaborative program between NOAA and its acquisition agent NASA.

The Science Behind JPSS

Information about our planet is vital for the ability to plan, predict, respond and protect our Nation's lives and property. JPSS Science is critical to accomplishing this primary goal.

NOAA View

NOAA View is an interactive tool that allows users to explore NOAA data, including information captured by satellites. Browse, animate, and download high-resolution imagery of the world's oceans, land, atmosphere, cryosphere, and climate.

Meet the JPSS Team

NOAA and NASA work together in a joint JPSS Program Office, which oversees the development of instruments, spacecraft, ground system and science. In addition to NOAA and NASA, JPSS is supported by a large number of contracting companies, academic institutions and research organizations.